Suicide Squad


Viewed – 09 August 2016  Cinema

In the lead up to this movie’s release and the surrounding hype, I began to see this as potentially DC’s answer to Marvel’s Guardian’s of the Galaxy – that being a refreshing, new spin on an increasingly tired comic-book movie genre, and various images, trailers and the casting was looking very promising.  But I’m getting a little head of myself.

suicide-squad

A government initiative headed my Viola Davis decides to bring together a group of imprisoned super-villains in hope of having someone to throw into the shit in case said shit goes down and they don’t want innocent lives put at risk.  These folks are expendable you see, killers, crazies and well, nobody’s going to miss them, right?  So step up former psychiatric therapist Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie), assassin for hire Deadshot (Will Smith), deadly walking arsonist Diablo and talking man-shaped reptile Killer Croc, amongst others.  However after a powerful sorceress escapes and starts to wreck havoc on the city, Viola Davis has no choice but to put her plan into action.

JokerIt’s a cool idea and certainly fun seeing these recognisable (and not so recognisable) faces team up and fight for the good guys, and I thoroughly enjoyed their interactions and banter, with several funny lines.  And well, when these guys kick ass it’s a sight to behold.  It also helps there’s a killer soundtrack here too (Eminem, The White Stripes, The Rolling Stones to name but a few). Margot Robbie as I expected steals the show as the spunky, sexy and homicidal Harley and is clearly loving her character.  Also it was great to see Will Smith back in action and he doesn’t disappoint, even if for him he seems a little restrained by a bloated cast.  Also on hand is Jared Leto as Joker, who has presence and looks disturbing and is a joy to watch – despite not have much to do than continually try to kidnap Harley, a disappointment considering how pivotal the character has usually been.

However, the surrounding plot is flimsy at best and despite some interesting backstories and decent if somewhat repetitive action, the whole point and where the movie goes is weak.  I also came away thinking Viola Davis and her military cronies were a bunch of idiots with a scheme that seemed to fall to pieces from the off.  Also I was puzzled at some of the line delivery especially as most lines seemed pretty sharp whilst others were barely audible.  With a more involving plot and dropping of a couple of the less interesting characters (that Australian guy was pointless), more focus on Joker and less on a sorceress whose motives aren’t explained … this could have been amazing.  As it stands it was simply good fun.

Verdict:  3 /5

Men In Black 3


Viewed – 24 November 2012. Pay per view rental

In the years since the last MIB movie, star Will Smith has almost retired, letting his kids (not quite) steal the limelight and series director Barry Sonnenfeld has disappeared into television obscurity … however now we have the third outing, and I’m happy to report it’s worth the wait.

Will Smith’s Agent J must go back in time to 1969 to prevent a vengeful alien from murdering Agent K.  Simple concept, making way for plenty of gags, cool gadgets (fave: the one wheel bikes) and a shed load of effects.  The villain here may be little more than a mutant biker with bad teeth, but with good turns from both Tommy Lee Jones (looking very old) and Josh Brolin (perfect) as his younger, spritlier self not to mention Smith on perfect wise-cracking form … this happily retained the look and feel of a sequel popped out a year or so after the last, not ten years late.

At times the plot gets a bit bogged down in details, and the humour doesn’t hit quite as often as say, MIB #1 … and there is green screen over kill causing some moments to look fake. But regardless, none of this prevented MIB 3 from still being great entertainment.

Verdict 4 /5

Hancock


Viewed – 23 Jan 2009  DVD

Now what I don’t get is why this film came in for so much stick when it came out in the summer blockbuster season.  Ok, it may not be as knowingly stylish as Wanted or as in-yer-face as Batman & Hellboy (ooh, there’s a movie waiting to happen), but this charming and well made superhero flick has it where it counts – originality.  Oh and Will Smith is brilliant in it.

Will plays a superhero powered guy shunned by the people he tried to help because of his uncaring, self-destructive attitude and careless approach to every situation.  Its funny as hell, and also very different than what we are usually erm, treated to.  Step in Jason Bateman’s advertising exec who sees in Will (or should I say Hancock?) a chance to prove himself and help someone who obviously needs a new image and way of thinking.

If it wasn’t for Will Smiths obvious charisma this bold idea would fall flat on its face, and with the help of a likable Bateman and a purr, hubba hubba Charlize Theron, as well as some truly exciting set-pieces and quality effects, this is just really good entertainment.  So what if things get a bit serious in the final act – in my opinion, it still works and adds plenty of emotion too.  What more could you want?

Verdict:  4 /5

I Am Legend


Viewed – 25 January 2008  Cinema

Ok, so what we have here has been in the pipeline for a long time, and even was once set to star Arnold Schwarzenegger (before he went all Political), and with the advent of the acclaimed 28 Days & Weeks Later films, the idea is no longer the fresh piece of high-concept cinema it once might have been.  But hell, we have Will Smith as the (possibly) last man on earth, desperate to find a vaccine to a virus outbreak after a cure for cancer goes horribly wrong.   That’ll put bums on seats right there, trust me.

New York gets the deserted-streets treatment, and its stunning, almost beautiful in its desolation, and as Smith hunts for food, partnered by his faithful dog Sam, his last real friend on earth, you’re right there with him.  This whole film has been done with an attention to the human condition and the plight of Will’s solitary lifestyle, that its a somewhat heart breaking and very convincing portrayal…and Smith pulls it off remarkably, handling the tear jerking moments equally as well as the action, and little touches like stilted conversations with shop Mannequins he’s placed around the city for ‘company’, really bring the message home.

Of course, like 28 Days Later, we also have rabid zombie-types, that although no where near as chillingly scary as those in Danny Boyle’s classic horror…they are still a ferocious bunch, and add plenty of adrenaline to proceedings, that otherwise things may have got a little boring.  So at the end of the day, this offers some gripping, heart-rendering moments and satisfying action, but not many surprises…sad then that its no longer such an original idea, but as ideas go – it still kicks ass.

Verdict:  4 /5