I Am Not A Serial Killer


This relatively unknown, low budget indie thriller caught my eye due to it’s concept.  A teenage kid who believes he could become a serial killer due to an obsession with murderers and his own sociopathic behaviour, stumbles on an actual serial killer case in his home town.  That’s a (pun intended) killer concept right there.

I Am Not A Serial Killer

Borrowing a tad from the overall plot of Dexter (takes a serial killer to track a serial killer) and with a ghoulish tongue-in-cheek sense of humour, I was easily along for the ride.  The idea of exploring serial killers and lending that knowledge to tracking one down is interesting, but my gripe with this is that it’s a movie that doesn’t entirely have the balls to follow through on it’s concept.  That being said performances are decent, especially genre legend Christopher Lloyd and young unknown Max Records (who clearly has to open a vinyl store).  I also thought the killer’s motives were strangely sympathetic and at times it did get pretty grim and macabre (the lead character also works in a mortuary, so is surrounded by death).   Now I’m going a little into spoiler territory in the next paragraph so if you want to go into this one totally fresh STOP READING NOW.

(mild spoilers).  My issue is that the killer is not human, but some sort of creature and like movies before it (Jeepers Creepers, IT) that began promisingly with an eerie villain but later descend into ‘its a monster or an alien’ when they’re finally unmasked is both lazy and rather contrived.  Why not make the serial killer a human being?  Or is that a little too close to reality?

Some out of place choices of rock music ruin the mood occasionally, and overall it came off like an extended X-Files episode (not a bad thing).  However I still managed to enjoy this despite it’s shortcomings and a reliance on horror movie convention.

Verdict:  3 /5

Wolf Creek 2


Viewed – 23 September 2014  Online rental

I recall being rather underwhelmed by the popular but fairly lightweight original, and thought it’s lengthy build up to the horror and the reveal of the killer was too drawn out.  In it’s final moments it began to come to life and had at least one stand out, nasty scene (head on a stick!).  So imagine my surprise on reading several favourable reviews of this sequel.

wolfcreek2

Outback serial killer Mick Taylor, a bushman if ever there was a bushman in the wilderness of Australia, spends much of his time picking off tourists and back-packers who come to visit the eerie location of a huge crater, supposedly made by a meteorite.  With a fine line in Ozzy lingo and Australian history, he especially enjoys killing foreigners or anyone not well versed in the land of Oz. 

Shot well and with a keen eye for gore and violence, this feels like it’s on the right track, and is a lot more action-packed, with this time Mick being centre stage.  Now unlike the original, the mystery and atmosphere is missing in place of some stand out kills (the cops…).  Also unlike last time around there’s no real time to get invested in the innocent victims before Mick is despatching them.  Now Mick himself, played larger-than-life by John Jarratt is an interesting creation, but because the movie is all focused on him, his clichéd bushman swagger and often comical lines turns many of his scenes into farce (a truck chase to the tune of The Lion Sleeps Tonight … really?), and loses much of his potential menace – like what they did to Freddy Krueger in the Elm Street sequels.  Oh and would it have hurt to get a bit more backstory on him?  Or any for that matter. 

For the ample gore and plenty of energy, this was still fun, but for a horror it relied too much on one liners and in-jokes than actually scaring it’s audience – a big fail in my book.  Hopefully they won’t bother with Wolf Creek 3.

Verdict:  2.5 /5

Killers


Viewed – 02 September 2014  Blu-ray

Ok, I’ll admit I like shock-cinema foreign thrillers such as Old Boy & I Saw The Devil, not just because they are usually very violent with often taboo subject-matter, but also because they’re usually directed with no end of skill and style.  This is no exception.  A serial killer is going about picking up prostitutes, then torturing and killing them, whilst filming them on camera.  He then uploads the footage to an internet website where it attracts the attention of a lonely, troubled reporter whose career and marriage have both failed.  When the reporter is mugged one night, his interest in the videos takes over and he films the two men he murders in self-defence, and proceeds to upload the footage onto the website.  This then sparks the interest of the serial killer, who starts to goad the reporter into doing further killings.

Killers

Directed by The Mo Brothers, this unflinching character study may not be pleasant viewing, and involves some pretty graphic scenes (the attack on the pimp for example) but excels at showing two complex personalities, delivered with powerful performances from the leads.  The serial killer’s inner demons surrounding the death of his sister, his inability to comfortably date the nice girl from the florists … and the reporter’s struggle to bond with his own daughter whilst hoping to reconcile his relationship with his ex … are both very well observed.  This was also a clever commentary on modern society’s obsession with documenting and filming even the horriblest of situations (who can forget how many filmed the World Trade Centre attacks?).  Also at times how we saw something from the killer’s point of view, only for it to have subtle differences when seen through someone else’s eyes was very clever.

Deviations into English language were a bit odd (the two guys seem to resort to English when speaking via webcam), and supporting characters are under-developed.  It may also explore a well-worn subject … but offered up a fresh perspective and some genuine surprises.  Not for everyone, but fans of hard-hitting thrillers with plenty to leave you thinking – this is one to check out.

Verdict:  4 /5

The Silence of the Lambs


Viewed – 12 April 2013  Blu-ray

Always nice to revisit a classic, especially on Blu-ray.  I have long loved this Oscar-winning thriller, that for me is still the finest serial killer movie ever made (with Seven being a close second).  Sitting down to this last night it wasn’t hard to see why it gained such acclaim.  The performances are perfect, with a vulnerable but tough Jodie Foster, near unrecognizable in a black hair dye-job (or wig?).  Mentored by Scott Glen’s equally well cast Jack Crawford.  Yet the big selling point for me, and what has gone on to define a career is Anthony Hopkins’ amazingly creepy but charismatic turn as Dr Hannibal Lecter – one of the greatest creations in movie villain history.

silence-of-the-lambs-hannibal-560

Foster plays FBI agent Clarice Starling, given the task of interviewing imprisoned serial killer and former psychiatrist Hannibal Lecter as the FBI attempt to track down currently at large killer Buffalo Bill.  This is a movie that is just as much character study as it is a thriller, with exceptional performances across the board (with a very unnerving Ted Levine as Bill – ‘it puts the lotion in the basket’), and very well observed and realistic direction from Jonathan Demme.    Silence of the Lambs has become the blue-print for all serial killer movies from Seven, to Copycat and even has echoes in current TV series The Following, that for me it just can’t be faulted.  Yes over the years it has been satirized  which I think is a shame, because on its original release this hit viewers hard, and in my opinion still should.

The Blu-ray isn’t quite as impressive.  The picture, whilst acceptable and with moments of good detail, seems overly soft.  The sound in 5.1 DTS Master Audio is decent and punchy however with good crisp dialogue, which is very important in this particular movie.  Extras are mostly carry-overs from the previous DVD editions, but remain extensive with several documentaries and featurettes, trailers, deleted scenes and outtakes.  The only exclusive to this HD release is a feature-length bonus called ‘breaking the silence’ that has the movie playing as interviews with the cast and film makers pop up as well as interesting bits of trivia.  An audio commentary would have been nice but is sadly absent.

Verdict:

(the movie)  5 /5

(the Blu-ray)  3.5 /5

The Collector


Viewed – 28 October 2010  Blu-ray

When a movie claims on the front cover to be from the writers of Saw IV-VI, I wouldn’t consider that to be much to boast about, considering that on a whole they were the weaker entries in the franchise.  That being said this does at least offer a fairly interesting premise, that of a professional thief who breaks into a rich family’s house to obtain a priceless diamond so to save his girlfriend from some gangster’s she owes money to.  Yet on entering the house he soon discovers the family have been taken hostage by a deranged serial killer and further more, has set a series of elaborate traps around the house incase anyone tries to escape, or in the case of the thief, interrupt.

Sean Penn look-a-like Josh Stewart plays the thief faced with the decision of whether to take the diamond and run or try to save the family, whilst the killer himself is a wrestler mask wearing bandy-legged freak that is immediately creepy.  As this is from the guys responsible for several of the Saw movies, the traps are imaginative, the murders and torture scenes gut-wrenching and skillfully played out, and the whole movie drips of style and atmosphere.  Now with that in mind, the movie does borrow somewhat from that other burglar enters the wrong house movie The People Under The Stairs as well as the previously mentioned franchise, and often the movie keeps yelling at the viewer that this killer is being set up as some sort of new icon in horror, which sadly he is not, as his look isn’t visually interesting enough to be the next Jason or Michael, and charisma is none existent, so Freddy and Hannibal can rest easy.  Oh and the opening credits rip off Seven unashamedly, to much lesser effect.

Overall though this is competently made horror that although mostly undemanding, has several ‘oh shit’ moments and assured direction.  But a sequel, I’d be very surprised to see.

Verdict:  3 /5