Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2


Viewed – 02 May 2017  Cinema

The first movie was my favourite of 2014, so the prospect of a sequel was very exciting.  This time around we find the unorthodox gang of heroes causing strife with a race of beings after Rocket the Raccoon (voiced by Bradley Cooper) gets a little light-fingered with some batteries.  However following a space battle that could cause the guardian’s lives to end abruptly, a mysterious stranger saves the day.  Turns out Star Lord (Chris Pratt) has a Dad who just so happens to be a pretty powerful guy himself, played with charismatic flair by the ever dependable Kurt Russell.

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This fills in a few gaps left over from the last movie, especially the question surrounding Chris Pratt’s father and it was great being back in the company of these very likable characters again.  The dialogue is especially sharp throughout, something that was a highlight of the last movie and the jokes & references come thick and fast to make this a ton of fun.  Pratt’s character constantly makes quips about eighties pop-culture such as TV shows like Cheers and characters such as Skelator and Pac-Man, and makes him a very relatable and refreshing presence in this sort of movie.  I was also glad to see that, despite the trailers, Baby Groot isn’t over-used but damn is he cute and very funny every second he’s on screen.

Kurt RussellThe soundtrack, another highlight last time around isn’t quite as memorable (apart from a great use of Mister Blue Sky by ELO) and a left-over side plot involving sisters Nebula (Karen Gillen) and Morgana (Zoe Saldana) felt unnecessary.  I also did not get much out of the gold-painted race that turn up at the beginning and chase after our heroes.  That being said Michael Rooker’s Yondu was again a joy and I’ve always liked the actor and we get some great moments with him here.  The same can be said for scene-stealing Dave Bautista as Drax.  Action generally is top-notch but the plot didn’t grab me as much or feel as layered this time, with the whole Kurt Russell’s planet sequence stopping the movie dead at one stage.

As it stands though this was a solid sequel and I can’t wait to see what comes next.  The Guardians of the Galaxy will return!

Verdict:  4 /5

Deepwater Horizon


Viewed – 31 January 2017  online rental

I love a good disaster flick.  Brings back to me memories of movies such as Towering Inferno, The Poseidon Adventure and  probably also Titanic.  So this based on true events story was an easy prospect.  Mark Wahlberg, one of those actors who I’ve always enjoyed in pretty much anything stars alongside veterans Kurt Russell and John Malcovich in the story of a colossal disaster that hit the an oil rig off the gulf of Mexico in 2010.

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Wahlberg plays Mike Williams, an electrical engineer who returns to work at Deepwater Horizon, leaving his dutiful wife (Kate Hudson) and daughter back home for what he believes will be a routine time on-board an oil rig.  However after coming up against the bureaucratic dealings of a group of BP representatives (headed by Malcovich) Mike along with his supervisor Jimmy (Russell) begin to realise several safety measures may have been overlooked.

The movie takes a bit of time to get going and I’ll admit some of the technical jargon went over my head.  Also Malcovich, usually a reliable presence in any movie, seemed particular subdued and sported a rather dodgy accent.  With that said, once things do go south, its full on thrills and spills for the remaining running time.  This is pretty intense stuff, directed with authenticity and boasts several heart-in-mouth moments that to be honest made the experience really jump from the screen and unnerve me.  Effects work, both practical and I’m guessing CGI were very impressive too.  Wahlberg, a very likable actor but with not that much depth, was also a surprise, proving convincing throughout; not too heroic but very human.  Russell was a little more stereotyped but despite looking older than his heyday, still had screen presence.  Also add to this what appeared to be first time actors or regular people filling out some of the extras for added realism and this had echoes of Tom Hanks vehicle Captain Phillips for an utterly believable representation of a shocking event.

Recommended.

Verdict:  4 /5

The Hateful Eight


Viewed – 07 May 2016  Blu-ray

(updated: 06/08/2016) I approached this with expectations seriously dialled back after hearing a few mixed and negative reactions to Quentin Tarantino’s eighth directorial effort.  Following up arguably one of his best movies, Django Unchained was no easy prospect but as expected with a director that single-handily seemed to shake up a tired industry in the 90s with his brand of pop-culture referencing, sharply written scripts, this doesn’t even try.  Instead what we get is a slow burning but thoroughly gripping character-piece that harks back to Tarantino’s bold, iconic début Reservoir Dogs more than anything else he’s made.

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Kurt Russell is a bounty hunter transporting a woman accused of murder (Jennifer Jason Leigh) via stage coach to Red Rock, when he comes across fellow Bounty Hunter and former Major Samuel L. Jackson who also needs to get to Red Rock to claim his own bounty.  Yet along the way a blizzard hits and the men are forced to hold up in a local tavern, where they come across several other colourful characters.  Like Tarantino at his best, the key to enjoying this is the snappy dialogue, the fleshed out characterisation and the tension that gradually builds.  Some have said this movie is slow, that nothing happens … and considering it’s on for over 160 minutes, I understand the restlessness, but awaiting a gunfight or some violence or a chase etc. is to miss the point – it’s not about action, the dialogue is the action and it’s about learning about all these characters, figuring out their motives and watching it all play out, not unlike a game of chess.  With this in mind, Tarantino is on solid form – his writing skills, if a tad self-indulgent throw in humour, red herrings and surprises and still has that edge that made his name.  On a pure dialogue-basis I’d even go as far to say it’s some of his best writing in years.

Hateful EightSamuel L. Jackson is the star here and does a stellar job and is ice-cool and decidedly him, no bad thing if like me you’re a fan.  It was also great to see Kurt Russell commanding and tough-talking, and a flamboyant Tim Roth was also a lot of fun.  There isn’t really a bad turn here, and even lesser characters like The Mexican stand out.  A turn of events in the final act was a tad hard to swallow however and the ending was a little over the top and perhaps overly brutal.  Yet that’s to be expected I guess, and along with Ennio Morricone’s classy score and simply gorgeous cinematography, obviously echoing the great westerns of yesteryear like Once Upon A Time In The West or The Good The Bad and the Ugly … this love letter to the genre, and to cinema itself just worked for me on many levels.

Verdict:  4 /5

Big Trouble In Little China


Viewed – 04 April 2015  Blu-ray

I remember this being one of my favourite movies when growing up.  I watched it on VHS and subsequently on TV and picked it up on DVD, so naturally I was going to get the Blu-ray when it came out.  Telling the story of wise-cracking truck driver Jack Burton (Kurt Russell) who during a stop off at San Francisco China Town re-acquaints himself with old friend Wang (Dennis Dun).  Wang informs Jack that he’s meeting his new girlfriend at the airport.  However on going to collect her the duo witness a kidnapping and soon, along with the help of plucky reporter Gracie Law (Kim Cattrall – Mannequin, Sex & The City) head into the Chinese underworld on a rescue mission.

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This is an immediately fun, fast paced, albeit very 80’s experience.  Kurt Russell is on fine form; a little more bumbling than some of his other roles but it works a charm as the fish out of water in a whole heap of trouble.  Dunn, the actor who really should have become a bigger name than he did pretty much steals it though and Catrall is particularly beautiful, spunky and proves great support.  Directed by John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing) this genre entry overflows with ideas, is a love letter to Hong Kong action movies with heavy influence from Shaw Brothers Kung Fu and more mystical fair like Tsui Hark’s Zu: Warriors Of The Magic Mountain, and it’s clear everyone involved must have had a ball making it.  Add to this Carpenter’s excellent guitar-synth score and well, this is a movie that just bleeds fun.

It’s all very cheesy, the dialogue and some of the jokes are as corny as it gets and some of the action in my opinion could have been shot better – and well, the pace is exhausting, where I was wishing the breaks were applied occasionally.  Yet with a great villain (genre favourite James Hong – Blade Runner, Wayne’s World 2) and some still great looking effects work … I got a kick out of watching this again.

The Blu-ray from Arrow Video is once again an above average treatment for a classic movie.  Detail on a whole is high even if the slightly smudgy look of the era is retained.  Faces and sets all display a depth with decent shadow detail and good clarity.  The re-mastered DTS HD Master Audio soundtrack may not make much use of the surrounds but the bass-heavy score is effectively delivered and dialogue is crisp throughout.  Extras-wise we get a pretty exhaustive selection with several interviews from cast and crew as well as a vintage featurette, music video, galleries, an extended ending and a feature-length commentary.  Add to this Arrow’s inclusion of a detailed booklet written by John Kenneth Muir, and this rounds off an impressive treatment for a still very enjoyable movie.

Verdict:

(the movie) 3.5 /5

(the Blu-ray) 5 /5

John Carpenter’s The Thing


Viewed – 23 December 2011 Blu-ray

John Carpenter’s 1982 sci-fi horror remains one of the defining moments of eighties genre film making.  Kurt Russell, hot off Carpenter’s own Escape From New York plays MacReady, part of an American research team based in Antarctica who discover an alien life form that can simulate other creatures … including humans.  As tension builds and the creature wrecks havoc, soon everyone is looking at one another in order to find out who might be ‘the thing’.  This great premise is given no end of tension and believable atmosphere from Carpenter’s classy, slow-burning direction, and showcases how assured a talent he once was.

Aided by a foreboding score by legendary composer Ennio Morricone, this is a movie filled with unease and truly yukky practical effects from award-winning make-up guru Rob Bottin, that arguably have a greater impact than the recent CGI work in the remake/prequel.  In comparison to that movie, there is much similar here and I was impressed just how well both movies tie in with each other, yet with a more interesting range of characters, and a fair bit more tension throughout, along with an ending that leaves the audience with a few things to ponder – this is a better all round experience, but not streets ahead … meaning both movies complement one another nicely.

The Blu-ray has a very nice, clear image with plenty of detail.  The Arctic photography looks gorgeous in the opening moments, and the various effects scenes stand the test of time well.  Sound-wise there are a couple of problems such as Kurt Russell’s voice sounding like it’s been re-dubbed at times, which is weird to say the least, and brief moments of lip-sync issues.  Yet overall this is an acceptable audio/video presentation for a movie that’s nearly 30 years old.  Extras consist of a very entertaining commentary from Russell & Carpenter, as well as picture-in-picture talking heads that reveal plenty of info over the movie’s legacy.  We also get outtakes, galleries and also the documentary John Carpenter’s The Thing: Terror Takes Shape.  Very impressive.

Verdict: 4 /5