Uncut Gems


Viewed – 04 February 2020. Netflix

I’ve never been the biggest fan of Adam Sandler. His movies especially these days just slip under my radar and except for The Wedding Singer none of his output has ever impacted me much. However, some positive word of mouth has been doing the rounds about this, so I thought I’d check it out. Sandler plays Howard, a crooked jewellery store owner and general wheeler-dealer with a wife, kids and a girlfriend on the side who lives his life ducking mob loan sharks and continually struggling to keep one step ahead of people. After obtaining some priceless uncut gems however, a way out just might be on the cards.

I found Howard’s lifestyle exhausting to watch yet it’s portrayed fairly realistic even if it never made me sympathise with such an obviously self-inflicted plight. What’s going on and why is pretty much glossed over as well. And… despite best intentions, Sandler fails to be much more than a caricature surrounded by more believable casting (including NBA star Kevin Garnett as himself). This isn’t helped by what appears to be a bad Heat-era Al Pacino impression Sandler is doing throughout.. With that said the sheer relentlessness of the direction is commendable.

For fans this proves a departure for Sandler they might appreciate but for me he didn’t stand out or prove all that appealing … the story pretty much goes exactly where I expected also. Forgettable.

Verdict: Poor

50 First Dates


Viewed – 19 July 2014  DVD

If someone hadn’t borrowed me this, I wouldn’t have ever watched it.  I don’t really go for romantic movies, and have never been that bothered about popular comedy star Adam Sandler.  However I must admit to being pleased that I did!  Sandler plays Henry, a womanizing guy who works at a sea-life centre, and has a fear of commitment.  One day he meets Lucy (Drew Barrymore) and for the first time he finds himself really falling for her innocent charm and beauty.  Yet the following day, when he goes to talk to her again, she has no recollection of him.  You see, Lucy has short-term memory loss and only remembers him for one day – the next, he’s a stranger, and he has to woo her all over again.

50-First-Dates

This is a great idea for a romantic comedy and also quite a touching tale of wanting to be with someone but unable to truly be together from her point of view.  It’s sort of sad too, certainly giving my emotions a run for their money surprisingly.  Comedy is laid on fairly thick (Sean Astin’s lisp…) by supporting characters (including an annoying Rob Schneider), and at times it gets a bit silly and crude (walrus vomit anyone?), but this adds some flavour to what otherwise would have been a little too sugar-coated.  Barrymore & Sandler are very good and believable in a tricky situation, and it was also great to see Dan Aykroyd in an extended cameo.

A very charming, feel good and thought-provoking experience that was much better than I initially expected.

Verdict:  4 /5